April 15, 2016

Catholic News Around Indiana

Compiled by Brandon A. Evans

Diocese of Evansville

Scouts Enjoy Retreat At Catholic Center

Deacon Charlie Koressel, left, presents Bishop Charles C. Thompson with the Bronze Pelican Award.By Joseph Dickinson (Special To The Message)

The Diocese of Evansville’s Catholic Center hosted the 2016 Boy Scout/Venturing Retreat, which is sponsored by the Diocesan Catholic Committee on Scouting. Deacon Charlie Koressel, Scout Chaplain for the Diocese, and DCCS Chairman Bill Noll led the March 4-6 event. 

There were 104 scouts, venturers, and adults representing 13 troops or venture crews from across the diocese present for a variety of activities. The theme, following the Extraordinary Jubilee Year of Mercy proclaimed by Pope Francis, was “Blessed are the merciful for they shall receive mercy” (Matt 5:7).  

Father Pascal Nduka, associate pastor of Evansville Annunciation Parish, and Diocese of Evansville Seminarians Deacon Ambrose Wanyonyi, Deacon Tyler Tenbarge and Luke Hassler gave presentations on the theme. Each talk was followed by small group discussions led by members of the Order of St. Dominic Savio – older scouts who have earned emblems for further study of their faith. 

Liturgy and prayers included Mass on Saturday morning celebrated by Father Nduka, the Angelus, Liturgy of the Hours, Stations of the Eucharist, and a number of religious songs accompanied by musician members of the Order of St. Dominic Savio – assisted by Diocese of Evansville Seminarian Ben Dahlquist. 

Perhaps the most inspirational part of the weekend was the candlelight procession of the Eucharist led by Deacon Koressel and followed by Reconciliation during Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, which concluded with Benediction. Confessors included Father Ken Betts, senior associate pastor of St. Jams Parish in Haubstadt; Father Zach Etienne, pastor of Good Shepherd and St. Theresa parishes in Evansville; and Father Gordon Mann, pastor of Sts. Mary and John Parish in Evansville. 

Members of St. Dominic Savio also helped by making of a set of 10 prayer beads called Sacrifice Beads after St. Therese of Lisieux; and leading relay games illustrating feeding the hungry (egg/spoon relay), helping others (carrying relay), counseling the doubtful (blind walk) and building the Kingdom of God with others (building a tower). A blessing of good weather made it possible to hold several of these activities outside. 

While the youth were busy with these activities, talks, and discussions, some adults – especially new leaders in Catholic scouting – attended a course on understanding Scouting as youth ministry. 

Bishop Charles C. Thompson celebrated the retreat’s closing Mass. In an awards ceremony after the Mass, the Bishop was pleasantly surprised with the Bronze Pelican – an award given to those who have been active in supporting Catholic scouting. Also receiving this emblem was Catherine Egler of St. Mary Parish in Ireland, who has been active in Cub Scouting.

Photo caption: Deacon Charlie Koressel, left, presents Bishop Charles C. Thompson with the Bronze Pelican Award.
 

(For news from the Diocese of Evansville, log on to the website of The Message at www.themessageonline.org)

 

Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend

Parishioner paints paschal candle

Father Andrew Budzinski, pastor of St. John the Baptist Parish, Fort Wayne, stands by the Paschal Candle decorated by parishioner Art Cislo.By Mark Weber

Art is his name and art is his game. Arthur Cislo, longtime member of St. John the Baptist parish in Fort Wayne and master of all media in the art world, got a huge surprise at St. John’s 4:30 p.m. Mass on the first Saturday in Lent when the pastor, Father Andrew Budzinski, pointed to a five foot candle in the hands of seminarian David Huneck and said to the congregation, “Here’s our paschal candle. It’s going to be decorated by Art Cislo, our artist in residence. Please come up here, Art, and get the candle.”

Later in a planning session in Cislo’s studio, Art, Father Andrew and David Huneck discussed appropriate and required symbols for a paschal candle.  Cislo, who had worked in clay, paper, wood, glass, canvas and metal, finally would work in wax.

Once he began, Art became totally absorbed in the job and worked virtually full time for three weeks.  After sketching the layout with a china marker, he gouged the lines in the candle with carving tools and added colors with acrylic paint.

At the very top of the candle is the Jesus of Divine Mercy image, then by turning the candle, a chalice is seen with symbols of the Trinity. In heavenly descent, we see red rays depicting Christ’s blood flow into the chalice. Further down is the image of the crucified Lord with the Alpha and Omega signs on either side: “I am the beginning and the ending,” says the Lord.

At the foot of the cross is a skull from which crawls a serpent with its head crushed by the heel of the Virgin who is standing with St. John the Apostle on Christ’s right side. On the left is a centurion with a spear.

A dividing band of gold lettering appears next, spelling 2016 Anno Domini and below it are images of mercy depicted in the Gospels; first is Jesus washing Peter’s feet showing His disciples that service and mercy are paths that they too must follow.

This is followed by an image from the parable of the prodigal son where the father is holding, not scolding the son, portraying more mercy and forgiveness.

The next scene shows Jesus meeting the Samaritan woman at the well. Each figure has an aura (halo).  Jesus’ aura shows blue “living water” which He will give to become a spring of water welling us to eternal life. The Samaritan woman’s aura is empty except for the heads of her six “non-husbands.”  Gradually Jesus’ aura overtakes that of the woman, refreshing it; just as He does for all of us.

The final image is of the raising of Lazarus; the ultimate in mercy and power of the Lord.

Photo caption: Father Andrew Budzinski, pastor of St. John the Baptist Parish, Fort Wayne, stands by the Paschal Candle decorated by parishioner Art Cislo.
 

(For news from the Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend, log on to the website of Today’s Catholic at www.todayscatholicnews.org)

 

Diocese of Gary

Teens celebrate Divine Mercy Sunday with preview of World Youth Day pilgrimage

St. Teresa of Avila Catholic student center parishioners (left to right) Claire Brennecke, Grace Tam and Maggie Vail process with candles as Deacon Bob Marben carries a monstrance for Eucharistic Adoration and praying of the Divine Mercy Chaplet at the Valparaiso church on April 3. The teens are among five others at St. Teresa preparing to participate in World Youth Day this summer in Poland. (Anthony D. Alonzo photo)By Marlene A. Zloza

VALPARAISO—With just over 100 days left until they depart for a 10-day pilgrimage to Italy and Poland for World Youth Day 2016, nine youths from St. Teresa of Avila Catholic Student Center hosted a special Divine Mercy Sunday event April 3 to share prayers and plans with the community.

The teenagers invited the public to a procession after the 11 a.m. Mass, followed by the praying of the Divine Mercy Chaplet and Eucharistic Adoration, with a reception following.

The chaplet takes “only about 20 minutes to recite,” said St. Teresa of Avila Deacon Bob Marben, but is “just beautiful” when chanted. 

Guests were invited “to write down their (prayer) intentions on cards and we will take them to World Youth Day” and lift them up during the intercessions at the closing Mass, said Claire Brennecke, a junior at Valparaiso High School .

The reception gave guests the opportunity to ask the young people about the July 21 – Aug. 1 pilgrimage, and why they are making the trip. “I want to grow my faith, get better connected to God, and be with the pope,” said Brennecke, 16.

“I am really looking forward to exploring my faith more deeply,” said Alita Caron, 16, a VHS sophomore. “I want to carry the messages of the people to Mass, and bring back what we saw.”

Grace Tam, 16, also a VHS sophomore, called the trip “a great opportunity. My grandfather is Polish, which makes it special, and I really want to celebrate Mass with the pope. I can’t wait to experience all those people on fire for Christ.”

David Karr, 18, a senior at VHS, will prep for what he expects will be “a life-changing experience” with a 70-mile hike during a  Boy Scout camping trip in New Mexico.

Marben said the St. Teresa of Avila contingent, which includes  eight adults, began planning and fundraising for the trip, sponsored by the Diocese of Gary Office for Youth and Young Adults, “three years ago, as soon as Pope Francis announced it.”

Photo caption: St. Teresa of Avila Catholic student center parishioners (left to right) Claire Brennecke, Grace Tam and Maggie Vail process with candles as Deacon Bob Marben carries a monstrance for Eucharistic Adoration and praying of the Divine Mercy Chaplet at the Valparaiso church on April 3. The teens are among five others at St. Teresa preparing to participate in World Youth Day this summer in Poland. (Anthony D. Alonzo photo)
 

(For news from the Diocese of Gary, log on to the website of the Northwest Indiana Catholic at www.nwicatholic.com)

 

Diocese of Lafayette

At a deeper level, in a different light: Faith, art intertwine for Ball State University student

This artwork by Erin McAtee is titled “Stigmata.”By Caroline B. Mooney

MUNCIE — For Erin McAtee, a senior at Ball State University, artwork is an extension of faith that she uses to evangelize to others.

“My art is significantly influenced by my faith life,” she said. “Sometimes I use literal symbols in my work and sometimes my work is about everyday activities or people in who I see Christ. I am always thinking about themes or concepts of Catholicism and where I see that focus on the intertwining of faith and humanity.”

Artistic from a young age, McAtee, whose home parish is St. Boniface, Lafayette, started developing her skills while a student at Central Catholic Junior-Senior High School, Lafayette.

Now studying art education and printmaking at Ball State, she will graduate in December. McAtee has accepted a position as a Fellowship of Catholic University Students missionary in the fall of 2017. FOCUS is a national outreach that sends teams of trained missionaries to 74 college campuses.

“My faith has grown a lot while I have been at Ball State,” she said. “I came to college not really ready for a lot of spiritual challenges. I was immature and took part in college activities that were not leading me to Christ. I became involved with FOCUS while attending Bible studies and that has played a big part in the transformation of my faith and evangelization.

“I started to come to terms with the faith I grew up with,” McAtee said. “Did I want to make it my own? Or be a fallen-away Catholic — which would be easy when surrounded by so much secularism? I realized I was made for deeper relationship with Christ.”

McAtee is very drawn to artists from the German expressionist movement that explore themes of society and human relationships.

“It has helped me in my own art process,” she said. “I really admire the work of Georges Rouault, a devout Catholic who was rather quiet about his faith but left much of his work to silently reflect his beliefs. He was able to make religious art but people were not turned off by it. The topics he was interested in are the same ones that I striving for, but he was in the 20th-century, and I am the 21st-century.”

Her favored techniques are painting and “Itaglio” printmaking.

“Printmaking is a process of putting something on a plate or surface relief that involves etching – you have to learn how to draw with a carving tool,” McAtee said. “Each piece of wood can act differently, and has more graphic, bold, thicker lines.

“Every piece of art has some piece of me in it,” she said. “Nothing is too concessional or hard for me to show.”

Ball State University has bought several of her prints for permanent display, and McAtee has had pieces on display in campus art shows, with a senior show scheduled for April 18-25.

Photo caption: This artwork by Erin McAtee is titled “Stigmata.”
 

Carmel school’s first ‘Faith Rally’ an exciting day

Father Ben Muhlenkamp leads Our Lady of Mt. Carmel students in a Eucharistic procession to the school gym after celebrating Mass in the church on April 1. (Photo by Caroline B. Mooney)By Caroline B. Mooney

CARMEL — A first-ever “Faith Rally” was held for first- through eighth-grade students at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel School here on April 1.

“Our Dominican sisters have held days like this at many of our schools across the country and they have been so fruitful,” said the principal, Sister Mary Emily Knapp, OP, of the Dominican Sisters of St. Cecilia, Nashville, Tenn. “We wanted to offer this opportunity for our students to stop, interrupt their daily academic schedule and focus a whole day on prayer and retreat. We love this simple format that allows for an encounter with Christ, as well as service and leadership opportunities for the students.

“I am excited for our whole school community to grow in a relationship with Christ, and to grow in a deeper sense of community as well,” she said. “We have many parent volunteers and all our teachers are on board, which makes this a great day for our students.”

The rally began with Mass, followed by a Eucharistic procession to the school gym where adoration was offered throughout the day.

Father Ben Muhlenkamp of the Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend celebrated Mass and spoke to students as they came for adoration.

“I think the number one thing today is the personal moment where the children are going to be able to have adoration brought right to them,” he said. “Hopefully they take that moment personally because Christ does come to us personally.”

Eighth-grade students were assigned to be leaders of “households” — groupings of approximately 20 students from each grade level. Named for saints, each group will reunite annually at future retreats until the students graduate from Our Lady of Mt. Carmel.

Before the rally, each grade donated supplies to create care packages for refugees and single mothers. Students assembled packages at the retreat and wrote notes of encouragement to the recipients.

Many monasteries sent inspiring letters to students before the rally.

Photo caption: Father Ben Muhlenkamp leads Our Lady of Mt. Carmel students in a Eucharistic procession to the school gym after celebrating Mass in the church on April 1. (Photo by Caroline B. Mooney)
 

(For news from the Diocese of Lafayette, log on to the website of The Catholic Moment at www.thecatholicmoment.org)

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