February 5, 2016

Catholic News Around Indiana

Compiled by Brandon A. Evans

Diocese of Evansville

No news briefs are available this week

 

(For news from the Diocese of Evansville, log on to the website of The Message at www.themessageonline.org)

 

Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend

Evensong ecumenical vespers joins voices in prayer for unity

Bishop Kevin C. Rhoades offered the homily at the Ecumenical Evensong on Jan. 24 at Trinity Episcopal Church. The combined choirs of Trinity Episcopal Church and the Cathedral of Immaculate Conception, directed by Michael Dulac of the cathedral, provided the music. Bishop Edward Little of the Episcopal Diocese of Northern Indiana was the officiant of the service, which marked the Week of Christian Unity.By Tim Johnson

FORT WAYNE — Bishop Kevin C. Rhoades was the homilist at the Evensong Ecumenical Vespers on Sunday, Jan. 24, in Trinity Episcopal Church in downtown Fort Wayne. The event was part of the Week of Christian Unity celebrations, which began on Jan. 18, the feast of St. Peter’s Chair, and concluded Jan. 25, the feast of the Conversion of St. Paul.

The week of prayer has a history of over 100 years. This year’s theme was “Called to Proclaim the Mighty Acts of the Lord” from Peter.

Shawn Storer, coordinator of the diocesan Ecumenical Office, echoed the words of Pope Francis who recently reminded the faithful: “This Week of Prayer invites us to reflect on, and bear witness to, our unity in Christ as God’s people. All the baptized, reborn to new life in Christ, are brothers and sisters, despite our divisions. Through Baptism we have been charged, as St. Peter tells us, ‘to proclaim the mighty works of the One who has called us out of darkness into His marvelous light.’ During this Week of Prayer, let us ask the Lord to help all Christians to grow in that unity which is greater than what divides us. Together, may we respond to His call to share with others, especially with the poor and forgotten of our world, the gift of divine mercy which we ourselves have received.”

The Right Rev. Edward Stuart Little, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Northern Indiana, was the officiant at the service. Clergy from local Christian denominations were also invited to attend.

The sung office of Evening Prayer in the Anglican tradition was led by the combined choirs of the Trinity Episcopal Church and the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Fort Wayne.

In the homily, Bishop Rhoades said, “We are used to the divisions within the Christian community, divisions that go back centuries. But these divisions are not natural. They are not good. They are wounds to the Body of Christ. They impair and impede the Church’s evangelizing mission in the world.”

There is a temptation to indifference and complacency in the face of Christian disunity. Bishop Rhoades noted, “We are here because we believe that it is God’s will that we be one. We know very well that there are many obstacles to the reestablishment of full communion among Christians. Rather than succumb to a sterile pessimism, we ask the Lord for the grace of renewed determination to pursue, with courage and generosity, the unity, which is His will.”

Photo caption: Bishop Kevin C. Rhoades offered the homily at the Ecumenical Evensong on Jan. 24 at Trinity Episcopal Church. The combined choirs of Trinity Episcopal Church and the Cathedral of Immaculate Conception, directed by Michael Dulac of the cathedral, provided the music. Bishop Edward Little of the Episcopal Diocese of Northern Indiana was the officiant of the service, which marked the Week of Christian Unity.
 

Pro-life community ‘walks the walk,’ ‘talks the talk’

Priests participate in the March for Life: South Bend including, near right, Father Bob Lengerich of St. Dominic Church, Bremen, and Father Chris Lapp, parochial vicar at St. Matthew Cathedral in South Bend and chaplain at Marian High School.By Jennifer Miller

SOUTH BEND — Marking the 43rd anniversary of the Roe v. Wade decision, the St. Joseph County Right to Life (SJCRTL) sponsored “March for Life: South Bend,” a peaceful walk to honor the lives lost and call elected representatives and community to change on Jan. 22 in South Bend. Indiana Gov. Mike Pence was in attendance offering his support.

On Sunday, Jan. 24, the Knights of Columbus Council No. 553 sponsored a reflective prayer service at St. Joseph Church on Hill Street and an engaging panel discussion focusing on supporting family life for a culture of life. Both events offered specific ways to “walk and talk” pro-life values.

Claire Fyrqvist, rally host, began the rally with Father Bob Lengerich of St. Dominic Parish in Bremen leading prayer, Terry Wedel from Silent No More sharing her moving experience with grace and Tom Limner of Deer Run Church offering the closing prayer.

The new march route over the St. Joseph River and into downtown South Bend to the Federal Courthouse offered a peaceful public testimony to life through the heart of the city. Over 500 people attended, 250 students from local Catholic schools, such as Corpus Christi, Holy Family, St. Joseph, South Bend, and Mishawaka Catholic.

St. Joseph School first sponsored a special prayer service for the eighth graders attending the march. High school students and teachers from Saint Joseph and Marian high schools also participated, as their travel to the national March for Life in Washington, D.C., was cancelled due to the blizzard on the East Coast. From babies and toddlers in strollers to seniors walking with canes, every age came and walked for an end to abortion in America.

At the Federal Courthouse, people lined the streets with a joy-filled and united spirit. Many families attended, including Rachel Myers and her daughter, Catherine, of Granger, who brought handmade signs, “Peace begins in the womb.” Gov. Pence greeted the marchers, thanking them for their tireless witness to life.

Photo caption: Priests participate in the March for Life: South Bend including, near right, Father Bob Lengerich of St. Dominic Church, Bremen, and Father Chris Lapp, parochial vicar at St. Matthew Cathedral in South Bend and chaplain at Marian High School.
 

(For news from the Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend, log on to the website of Today’s Catholic at www.todayscatholicnews.org)

 

Diocese of Gary

No news briefs are available this week

 

(For news from the Diocese of Gary, log on to the website of the Northwest Indiana Catholic at www.nwicatholic.com)

 

Diocese of Lafayette

Three parishes from Anderson and Carmel partner for first CommUNITY Care Day in Anderson

Before their guests were fitted for new shoes, volunteers washed each guest’s feet in an act of humility and kindness, just as Jesus did with the apostles. (Photo by Caroline B. Mooney)By Caroline B. Mooney

ANDERSON — A steady stream of 160 families, aided by approximately 200 volunteers, filed through St. Mary School here on Jan. 23, to receive clothing, school supplies and food.

It was the first CommUNITY Care Day, a partnership between the Merciful H.E.L.P. Center of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Parish, Carmel, and St. Mary and St. Ambrose parishes in Anderson.

“Our premise for the day is that children who have limited choices in life should have a day where they come and have all choices that are possible to them,” said Jayne Slayton, director of the Merciful H.E.L.P. Center. “The point is to improve their self-esteem and make them feel important, wanted and appreciated.”

Registered families — including 496 children and 187 adults — were given appointments to come in and select from new items. All were fitted for shoes, and children could choose between two pairs in their size. Before trying on shoes, volunteers washed each guest’s feet in an act of humility and kindness, just as Jesus did with the apostles.

“What I’ve been most impressed with is the number of volunteers who have come to work and they stayed as long as is necessary,” said Msgr. Robert L. Sell, pastor of St. Mary and St. Ambrose. Groups from Carmel came to deliver and organize the donations the day before the event.

“People were here at the break of dawn this morning,” he said. “It’s been great to see how willing they are to serve other people and share the blessings they’ve been given.”

Guests shopped amid racks of new winter coats, and also received scarves, hats and gloves. Onto the book room, where an assortment of titles were available for pre-Kindergarten through college students.

The clothing room offered one pair of pants, two shirts and a sweatshirt for sizes from 2T to men’s 44. If items weren’t available in someone’s size, they were given a Goodwill voucher to shop at the local store. Everyone also received underwear and socks. Babies were given diapers and wipes, onesies, socks and shoes.

Another room offered school supplies, including pens, pencils, folders, and loose-leaf notebooks.

Dorothy Body, foster mother to nine-year-old Kenyen, said the day was wonderful.

“We needed every bit of this – it’s a great help,” she said. “Kenyen didn’t want to come here, but once he saw everything, he was totally on board. He said, ‘You didn’t tell me it was going to be like this.’”

“I like everything,” Kenyen said. “I get to pick things out and people who worship God help you.”

Photo caption: Before their guests were fitted for new shoes, volunteers washed each guest’s feet in an act of humility and kindness, just as Jesus did with the apostles. (Photo by Caroline B. Mooney)
 

(For news from the Diocese of Lafayette, log on to the website of The Catholic Moment at www.thecatholicmoment.org)

Local site Links:

Like this story? Then share it!