October 21, 2005

Vatican Information Service Bulletin

The following, in it's entirety, is a copyrighted transcript of the Vatican Information Service.

SUMMARY OF SYNOD OF BISHOPS:

- Twentieth General Congregation

OTHER NEWS:

- Musical Creativity Nourished by Christian Roots of Europe

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 TWENTIETH GENERAL CONGREGATION

 VATICAN CITY, OCT 21, 2005 (VIS) - During the Twentieth General Congregation, held this morning in the Vatican's Synod Hall, the final message of the General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops on the Eucharist was presented and voted upon. The president delegate on duty was Cardinal Francis Arinze and 245 Synod Fathers were present. Following this, the relator general, the secretary general, and the relators of the Working Groups, or linguistic groups, continued their deliberations on the collective amendments to the propositions.

   The amended propositions are scheduled to be presented this afternoon during the Twenty-First General Congregation.

 

MUSICAL CREATIVITY NOURISHED BY CHRISTIAN ROOTS OF EUROPE

 VATICAN CITY, OCT 21, 2005 (VIS) - Following a concert given in his honor, which was held yesterday evening in the Vatican, Benedict XVI thanked the conductor of the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra and members of the choir of Ratisbone Cathedral and of the Athestis Chorus.

   The Holy Father said he felt proud that for thirty years the choir of Ratisbone Cathedral "was led with passion by my brother Georg," adding that "now, under Roland Buchner, it is still in excellent hands."

   With reference to the music he had heard and to its composers - from Palestrina to Richard Wagner, from Mozart to Verdi and Hans Pfitzner - the Holy Father said: "You have brought us an experience of something of the vastness of musical creativity which has, indeed, always been nourished by the Christian roots of Europe. Even if Wagner, Pfitzner and Verdi transport us to new dimensions for experiencing reality, the shared foundation of a European spirit formed by Christianity still remains present and effective. In this concert have we been able, once again, to feel how sublime music purifies, uplifts and, in the final analysis, makes us feel the greatness and beauty of God."

   Benedict XVI concluded by expressing the hope that "the harmony of music and song, which knows no religious or social barriers, may be a constant invitation for believers and all people of good will to seek together the universal language of love, which makes men capable of building a world of justice and solidarity, of hope and peace."

 

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