June 23, 2017

Speaker encourages Catholic men to be ‘Christ-driven’

Author and speaker Glenn Bill, a member of Christ the King Parish in Indianapolis, gives a presentation on attitude on May 17 at St. Luke the Evangelist Parish in Indianapolis during the seventh annual St. Joseph’s Men Valuing Prayer and Service Steak Dinner. The event, sponsored by the ministry at St. Luke that supports men in their faith, drew more than 200 attendees from across the Indianapolis North Deanery and beyond. (Photo by Sean Gallagher)

Author and speaker Glenn Bill, a member of Christ the King Parish in Indianapolis, gives a presentation on attitude on May 17 at St. Luke the Evangelist Parish in Indianapolis during the seventh annual St. Joseph’s Men Valuing Prayer and Service Steak Dinner. The event, sponsored by the ministry at St. Luke that supports men in their faith, drew more than 200 attendees from across the Indianapolis North Deanery and beyond. (Photo by Sean Gallagher)

By Sean Gallagher

More than 200 Catholic men from across the Indianapolis North Deanery and some parishes in the Lafayette Diocese gathered on May 17 at St. Luke the Evangelist Parish in Indianapolis to be encouraged in their faith, and learn how having a good attitude can positively shape the world.

The occasion was the seventh annual St. Joseph’s Men Valuing Prayer and Service (MVPS) Steak Dinner. MVPS is a ministry at St. Luke that seeks to help men grow and support each other in their faith.

Author and speaker Glenn Bill, a member of Christ the King Parish in Indianapolis, was the event’s featured speaker.

Honored during the evening were the many priests, Catholic Youth Organization coaches and leaders from Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School, Cathedral High School and Bishop Chatard High School, all in Indianapolis, who were in attendance.

“When I look at successful families, when I look at successful teams, when I look at successful corporations, when I look at successful friendships, there’s one thing in common and that one thing is their attitude,” said Bill, author of The ABC’s of Attitude. “It’s the way they dedicate themselves to the way they think.”

In his presentation, Bill described various attitude mistakes and practices that can boost a person’s attitude.

“Attitude addiction,” according to Bill, is not only being unwilling to change one’s attitude, but thinking that it can’t be changed.

“My hope for you is that if you have people who are addicted to their attitude, or if you’re addicted to the way that you think and you’re not willing or open to being taught,” Bill said, “that maybe this speech will help you appreciate, accept and be more kind to those who think differently than you.”

Another attitude mistake Bill described is “bad beliefs,” believing in things that are not true.

“If you believe some things that aren’t true, you’re probably lying to yourself about them,” he said. “What am I lying to myself about? More importantly, what am I lying about to my family, to my business partners, to God? He knows you’re lying.

“We all have thoughts and beliefs about other people, but they’re not all true. This is a big mistake. A lot of times, people believe everything that they tell themselves. General [Norman] Schwarzkopf taught us one thing about leadership: ‘the ability to tell the truth, not only to your troops, but to yourselves.’ ”

The last mistake Bill invited his listeners to consider is the “can’t conundrum” in which people compare themselves to others.

“The only person you should be competing with is yourself,” he said. “You should become a better person each and every day.”

Among the attitude boosters Bill pointed out was the importance of being aware of one’s attitude and its effect on other people.

“The best way to attitude awareness is to give a sincere compliment to somebody all the times that you meet them,” he said. “How good are you at complimenting other people when you meet them?”

Bill also encouraged his listeners to consider the role of emotions in shaping their attitude.

“It’s the emotions behind your thoughts that really cause us to act,” he said. “Attitude is really the filter of what our emotional needs are.”

Bill also spoke about the role of his faith in shaping who he is and his work in helping people become a positive influence on others.

“I’m Christ-driven,” he said. “Hopefully, all of you guys are Christ-driven. He’s done some amazing things [for me].

“He’s helped me grow up. He’s helped me meet some unbelievable people in my life. The Lord has put influences in my life where he’s said, ‘Glenn, this is really where I think you ought to go.’ So, the bottom line is that I believe that I’m called to do this.”

Bill’s final word to the event attendees was a challenge to them for the next day.

“I hope that somebody’s life will change tomorrow because your attitude that you wake up with will impact them,” he said, “you’ll have the influence that you want, and you’ll make the world a better and brighter place for those who come in touch with you.”

Chris Poglatsh, a member of Christ the King Parish, attended the MVPS event.

“I enjoyed it immensely,” he said afterward. “I think it’s good to get guys [together] like this. I don’t think it happens often enough.

“Men tend to get together over sports or a number of other things, but not specifically about faith. So, it’s nice to see that.” †

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