May 27, 2016

Catholic News Around Indiana

Compiled by Brandon A. Evans

Diocese of Evansville

Thousands Celebrate Our Catholic Community

Bishop-Emeritus Gerald A. Gettelfinger, left, and Bishop Charles C. Thompson. The Message photos by Kevin Kilmer.By Tim Lilley

Near the end of the May 14 “Rejoice!” celebration and Mass at Evansville’s Ford Center, Bishop Charles C. Thompson spoke to the heart of the diocese’s first-ever signature event. Ford Center officials estimated the crowd at about 4,000.

“There is so much richness in our Catholic faith,” the bishop told the crowd just before the final blessing. “If we don’t gather and celebrate it … who will?”

This first Catholic community celebration focused on elements that some likely take for granted – the celebration of Mass, the Sacrament of Individual Reconciliation, the Rosary, and the rich legacy of traditional Catholic music.

No other Saturday Anticipatory Masses were celebrated across the diocese. “On this particular occasion, we gather as more than members of individual parishes,” Bishop Charles C. Thompson told those in attendance.  “We gather as a diocese, particularly the Diocese of Evansville – created in 1944, comprised of 12 counties and extending just beyond 5,000 square miles. 

“The underlying cause for our theme … is firm belief in God’s merciful gifts,” the bishop added.  “Instilled with the abundant outpouring of the Holy Spirit, continuing with us since that very first Pentecost, we celebrate the beauty, goodness and truth of our Catholic identity, mission and presence as experienced in and through our lives, relationships, parishes, ministries and services.”

From the time the doors to the Ford Center opened at 2 p.m., people lined up for Individual Reconciliation. Volunteers built 10 individual stations, and all of them were busy for the full hour allotted as Bishop Thompson joined priests from across the diocese to administer the sacrament.

Inside the arena, message boards welcomed parishes from across the diocese and displayed historical highlights of the Catholic Church in Southwest Indiana.

Fourth Degree members of the Knights of Columbus provided an Honor Guard as priests and permanent deacons of the diocese joined Bishop Thompson and Bishop-Emeritus Gerald A. Gettelfinger for the opening procession.

“There is so much beauty, goodness and truth about our Church that rarely if ever makes it in any secular social media or popular imagination,” Bishop Thompson said in his homily. “Just to name a few:  We ordained two seminarians as deacons, just a month ago, to be ordained priests next year.  We are only weeks away from ordaining two priests and another deacon, to be ordained a priest later this year.  We continue to celebrate the richness of our unity in diversity from the various peoples and culture represented in our diocese.”

Photo caption: Bishop-Emeritus Gerald A. Gettelfinger, left, and Bishop Charles C. Thompson. The Message photos by Kevin Kilmer.
 

(For news from the Diocese of Evansville, log on to the website of The Message at www.themessageonline.org)

 

Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend

Redeemer Radio turns 10 years old

Redeemer Radio was visited by Al Kresta of Kresta-in-the-Afternoon who was covering an event at the University of Notre Dame. Kresta used the studio at the Little Flower Redeemer Radio location for this afternoon broadcast. Later he told his audience how he, “… enjoyed last week in South Bend, Indiana who had an outstanding radio station there. One of our great Catholic media outlets in America.”By Stephanie A. Patka

For Catholic radio station Redeemer Radio, 2016 is a special year because it marks the 10th anniversary of the audio ministry. Through the work of its dedicated staff, hundreds of volunteers, board members and prayer, Redeemer Radio has been a labor of love to accomplish the mission of nurturing individuals towards greater Catholic discipleship. The leadership of Redeemer Radio seeks to carry out its mission in many ways including proclaiming the truth of the Catholic faith, by providing encouragement on how to live one’s life in accordance with the Catholic faith and by supporting the development of individuals as Catholic leaders.

Redeemer Radio’s origins started with the name Fort Wayne Catholic Radio in December of 2005. Fort Wayne Catholic Radio began buying airtime on Fort Wayne’s WLYV AM 1450 and broadcasting Catholic Answers Live as early as December 2005 bringing full-time Catholic radio to Fort Wayne radio airwaves.

It was on January 3, 2006 that the late Bishop John M. D’Arcy blessed the Redeemer Radio studio on Illinois Road. Three days later, on the Feast of Epiphany on January 6th, the station was fully ready for operation.

January 6, 2006 also officially marked the day that the station began its own branding.  It was at a meeting of the board of directors and advisors that the name “Redeemer Radio” was unanimously adopted. As a moniker that has served humanity for centuries, it was chosen for the apostolate because of the truth and beauty of its message.

Executives and board members at Redeemer Radio credit the extensive number of faithful listeners and volunteers. The support of prayers, time and financial contributions are nothing short of impressive. March 2006 was the date of the inaugural Shareathon, which was to grow to a two times a year appeal for listener donations.

Since the inception of the radio station, Redeemer has aired Catholic Answers Live from EWTN. In the summer of 2014, Redeemer Radio launched their two-hour weekday morning show, titled “Redeemer Mornings,”  and launched this program on 95.7 FM in greater Michiana in December.

Redeemer Radio also airs Al Kresta with Kresta-in-the-Afternoon. The station was actually visited by Kresta who was covering an event at the University of Notre Dame. Kresta used the studio at the Little Flower Redeemer Radio location for this afternoon broadcast. Later he told his audience how he, “…enjoyed last week in South Bend, Indiana who had an outstanding radio station there. One of our great Catholic media outlets in America.”

New executive director, Cindy Black is excited about the future of the 10 year old radio station, “Our Redeemer Radio staff and volunteers gather daily to pray. We ask the Holy Spirit to help us in our mission as instruments heeding Pope Francis’ words: “It is urgently necessary to find new forms and new ways to ensure that God’s grace may touch the heart of every man and every woman and lead them to Him.”

Photo caption: Redeemer Radio was visited by Al Kresta of Kresta-in-the-Afternoon who was covering an event at the University of Notre Dame. Kresta used the studio at the Little Flower Redeemer Radio location for this afternoon broadcast. Later he told his audience how he, “… enjoyed last week in South Bend, Indiana who had an outstanding radio station there. One of our great Catholic media outlets in America.”
 

(For news from the Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend, log on to the website of Today’s Catholic at www.todayscatholicnews.org)

 

Diocese of Gary

A Catholic-Muslim Dialogue: Year of Mercy brings together people of both faiths seeking peace

Shayk Mongy El-Quesny of the Northwest Indiana Islamic Center speaks to those gathered at the Catholic-Muslim dialogue event hosted at St. Mary Church's Hammes Hall in Crown Point on Apri 24. The bridge-building meeting was sponsored by the office of Ecumenism & Interreligious Affairs at Calumet College of St. Joseph and the NWIIC. (Anthony D. Alonzo photo)By Marlene A. Zloza

CROWN POINT—In the spirit of brotherhood fueled by this Jubilee Year of Mercy, Bishop Donald J. Hying welcomed Shayk Mongy El-Quesny of the Northwest Indiana Islamic Center to a Catholic-Muslim Dialogue hosted by the Ecumenical Office of the Diocese of Gary and the Islamic Center on April 24 at St. Mary Church.

Moderated by Dr. Joan Crist, associate professor of Religious Studies at Calumet College of St. Joseph, the Sunday afternoon gathering drew more than 100 college students, Catholics, and members of the Islamic Center in Merrillville.

“Thank you for coming, you are here to build bridges, get to know each other,” Shayk Mongy said in his opening remarks. “We are in one boat, one ship, the ark of Noah, (and) will be sunk or saved.”

Calling it “a blessing and a joy to just be together today,” Bishop Hying welcomed the opportunity to learn from each other. “People define each other, but never take the time to find out who the other is,” he said. “The spark of the divine is in every person.

“In studying other religions, you come to know your own better. . .Christians will go home appreciating their religion better, and so will Muslims.”

The world’s second-largest religion, the followers of Islam, known as Muslims, believe that God (in Arabic, Allah) revealed his direct word for mankind to Muhammad (c. 570–632) and other prophets.

And according to Muhammad, Shayk Mongy said, (prophet) Adam’s greeting of choice was ‘Peace be with you,’ while the appropriate answer was ‘May peace and the mercy of God and his blessings be upon you,’ making the Year of Mercy an opportune time for followers of both religions to come together.

“We must thank God, without him we would not be here. God has favored us tremendously. . .we have to keep thanking him with every breath and even then we aren’t thanking him enough, even for allowing us to thank him,” Shayk Mongy said.

Concentrating on similarities, Shayk Mongy noted that of the 7.5 billion people on earth, more than 3 billion “believe in (one) God -   Christians and Muslims.”

When prejudice “crumbles away,” Bishop Hying said, “We see our commonalities and respect our differences.”

Outlining the six tenets of the Catholic faith – unity and plurality, transcendence and immanence, divine and human, Word and sacrament, unity of faith and reason, and justice and charity – Bishop Hying said among the “many points of rich commonality with Muslims” are “the unity of one (God), the priority of the divine and the radicalness of God.

“We need to learn how to live together,” and oppose “the forces that want to tear us apart,” the bishop added.

Photo caption: Shayk Mongy El-Quesny of the Northwest Indiana Islamic Center speaks to those gathered at the Catholic-Muslim dialogue event hosted at St. Mary Church's Hammes Hall in Crown Point on Apri 24. The bridge-building meeting was sponsored by the office of Ecumenism & Interreligious Affairs at Calumet College of St. Joseph and the NWIIC. (Anthony D. Alonzo photo)
 

‘Visitors’ experience the healing power of Our Lady of Lourdes

St. Michael the Archangel associate pastor Father Benjamin Ross (center) leads participants praying the Rosary during the 'Lourdes Virtual Pilgrimage' at the Schererville church's Lourdes grotto on May 14. The event, coordinated by the North American Lourdes Volunteers, included a presentation and Eucharistic Adoration. (Anthony D. Alonzo photo)By Marlene A. Zloza

SCHERERVILLE—It was the easiest transatlantic voyage you could imagine as more than 100 travelers – sans passports, luggage or security checks – made a Lourdes Virtual Pilgrimage on May 14 at St. Michael, thanks to Our Lady of Lourdes Hospitality – North American Volunteers.

Guided by Marlene Watkins, the founder and president of the only Our Lady of Lourdes Hospitality group outside of Europe, the visitors skipped a 10-hour air flight to Paris and another 90-minute flight to southern France near the Pyrenees Mountains, where the Blessed Virgin appeared 18 times in a grotto at Lourdes to a poor peasant girl of 14 who had yet to learn to read or write.

The purpose of virtual pilgrimages, made possible by large-screen digital projection, is to guide pilgrims through a prayerful visit to the Grotto, the experience of the Lourdes spring water, a touch of a stone from the grotto, and participation in a daily Rosary procession and Eucharistic blessing, sharing the blessings of the shrine without the travel.

Bernadette Soubirous first saw a brilliant light and a lady wearing a white dress Feb. 11, 1858, while collecting wood, and they prayed the rosary together in silence.

Each person on the virtual pilgrimage at St. Michael, as well as at St. Francis Xavier in Lake Station; St. Mary and St. Stanislaus Kostka School, both in Michigan City; St. Joan of Arc in Merrillville; St. Joseph in Hammond; and St. Mary in Kouts, had the opportunity to touch a piece of the rock from the Grotto at Lourdes and dip their fingers in water from the Lourdes spring, as well as take home a small bottle of Lourdes water.

Photo caption: St. Michael the Archangel associate pastor Father Benjamin Ross (center) leads participants praying the Rosary during the 'Lourdes Virtual Pilgrimage' at the Schererville church's Lourdes grotto on May 14. The event, coordinated by the North American Lourdes Volunteers, included a presentation and Eucharistic Adoration. (Anthony D. Alonzo photo)
 

(For news from the Diocese of Gary, log on to the website of the Northwest Indiana Catholic at www.nwicatholic.com)

 

Diocese of Lafayette

‘I can’t wait to see what God has in store’: Indiana pilgrims excited to experience World Youth Day 2016

By Caroline B. Mooney

World Youth Day 2016 will be held July 25-31 in Krakow, Poland. Open to young people ages 18 to 35, the event is a gathering for prayer, worship, and celebration of the Catholic faith.

Both St. Francis of Assisi Newman Center at Ball State University, Muncie, and St. Thomas Aquinas Newman Center at Purdue University, West Lafayette, are sending groups to the event.

“I think this pilgrimage will help me take a step back and let my faith overwhelm me,” said Alex Wallace, a Ball State graduate who is traveling with the Muncie group. “I look forward to experiencing Christ in a unique way with hundreds of thousands of hungry souls outdoors. It will also be celebrating in a common way, attending Mass as we do every Sunday.”

Pope Francis chose the fifth beatitude — “Blessed are the merciful, for they shall obtain mercy” (Mt 5:7) — as this year’s theme.

Events include a papal welcoming ceremony on July 28 and a papal morning Mass on July 31. Krakow is near the birthplace of St. John Paul II and the site of St. Faustina Kowalska’s visions of the Divine Mercy.

A WYD app is available with features to help pilgrims pray, learn, and interact with Catholics worldwide whether they are on the WYD pilgrimage or at home.

Rose Barbarich, a 2016 Purdue graduate, organized travel plans for a group of eight people traveling with St. Tom’s.

“I had always wanted to go, so two years ago I talked to Father Patrick (Baikauskas, pastor of St. Tom’s) about getting a group together,” she said. “He was all for it, and now we are set to leave July 23 and return Aug. 2.”

The group will fly into Munich and visit a Marian shrine in Prague before WYD starts. Afterward, they have a day trip scheduled to see the miraculous painting of the Black Madonna in Czestochowa, Poland.

“Once we are at WYD, I think the atmosphere of seeing all these young Catholic people in one place will be amazing,” Barbarich said. “Their energy, excitement, and motivation enlivening their faith to follow God is so promising. Watching so many young people seeing the city will be neat.”

Tiffany Hunsinger, a junior at Purdue, said she believes “the Holy Spirit is guiding me to Poland this summer because I wish to grow spiritually and personally from the experience and, as a result, help others to grow in their faith as well.”

“In the past year, my faith life grew tremendously thanks largely to my involvement at St. Tom’s,” she said. “I have been fortunate enough to take advantage of many of the wonderful ministries at Purdue that have guided my faith journey. On top of this, the staff and priests are phenomenal and also have helped tremendously.

“I have been praying quite a lot since I agreed to embark on my trip, as well as learning more about Pope Francis, as well as Pope John Paul II,” she said. “I believe everything will be an amazing experience in its own way, but if I had to choose, I am most looking forward to the night under the stars.”

On the last night of WYD, pilgrims have an all-night vigil sleeping on the ground in anticipation of the concluding papal Mass.
 

(For news from the Diocese of Lafayette, log on to the website of The Catholic Moment at www.thecatholicmoment.org)

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